On Logical Fallacies

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Popular opinion ≠ truth. Stating that a source’s credibility is enhanced by its popularity is a logical fallacy (argementum ad populum). Another important fallacy to avoid is the notion that the duration of how long an idea has been accepted reflects its validity (argumentum ad antiquitatem). The notion that something is true because it can’t be observed to be false (argumentum ad ignorantiam and argumentum ex silentio) should also be avoided. A few things to think about in regards to clinical decision making and practice.

I think we fall victim to these fallacies and others more often than we should, not necessarily with malicious intentions. Humans are creatures of habit and will often reflexively attempt to simplify complex topics and concepts to fit a narrative and world view. I am guilty of this as well, we all have our biases. However realizing this and taking time to think “why do I perform or choose the things that I do” is important to prevent this from perpetuating and having too strong an influence over one’s decisions. Remember the truth defies simplicity.

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